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Food Partners

Donate Food and Make a Difference

Donations of food

Our Food Partners deliver over 600 tonnes of fresh, frozen and long-life food and drink to FareShare every year. Food becomes surplus for simply reasons such as damaged packaging, labelling errors, over-production or short shelf-life. Our donors include Asda, Tesco, Greggs, Brakes, 3663, Nestlé, Sainsbury's, Greencore, New Smithfield Market Traders, Lidl and Kelloggs and we are always looking for new ones.

They do it because they want to reduce the amount of food that has to be disposed of. They want it to be used rather than go to waste. They do it because they want to demonstrate their commitment to social responsibility, to reduce food poverty, to help the wider community. They do it because they want to help disadvantaged people get better access to good quality food.

Our food donors are helping FareShare Greater Manchester to provide food to our community food members across Greater Manchester, organisations like Cornerstones, who provide free and low cost quality food to hundreds of people who are homeless, dealing with drug and alcohol abuse or living with mental health problems.

We Need More Food - Can you help?

We need more donated food to keep up with the needs of our Community Food Members. At the moment we are in urgent need of chilled foods and fresh produce. If you are in the food industry in Greater Manchester and would like to donate to us please call us on 0161 223 8200 option 4. We will need to know what the food is; the shelf life dates; whether it requires refrigeration and whether delivery to our warehouse in East Manchester is possible. Food Partner forms will be sent to you so that we can ensure traceability of product.

To donate in-date surplus food please contact our FareShare Team: call us on 0161 223 8200 option 4 or message us on twitter @FareShareGtrM or email: nick@emergemanchester.co.uk

FareShare and Allied Bakeries reach 3 year milestone

Allied Bakeries bread being loaded onto a FareShare van

This month FareShare is celebrating three years of working with Allied Bakeries to redistribute their surplus Kingsmill bread. As of this month, Allied have provided close to 400 tonnes of surplus bread, which helped to create almost 900,000 meals for vulnerable people across the UK.

FareShare started working with Allied Bakeries back in 2016, and, after an initial pilot redistribution scheme at the company’s Bournemouth depot proved successful, the process was rolled out to the company’s other sites in Cardiff, Stockport, Mendlesham, Glasgow, Washington and West Bromwich.

This partnership links each site to their nearest FareShare Regional Centre, ensuring surplus Kingsmill bread from Allied Bakeries benefits local communities in the areas in which they operate. Allied Bakeries also volunteer at their nearest FareShare Regional Centre, to see first-hand how their food is used and to help deliver it out to local charities.

During the three year partnership the company have also been a keen supporter of FareShare’s ActiveAte holiday hunger campaign, donating additional bread so FareShare can meet demand from the schemes that provide food to children from disadvantaged backgrounds over the summer holidays.

Lindsay Boswell, CEO of FareShare, said: “We are very proud of our ongoing partnership with Allied Bakeries. Because of their support, frontline charities feeding vulnerable people across the UK know they can rely on a regular delivery of good quality bread – which is so vitally important.”

Eva Wheeler, Head of Technical Operations is responsible for Allied’s FareShare initiative. She said, “It’s been hugely gratifying to see how keen our bakery and depot teams around the country have been to get involved with FareShare. We all want to feel that what we do every day can make a difference, particularly in our local communities: working in partnership with FareShare has now made that possible for us for three years. Thanks to everyone at FareShare and to all our people who have given their time to make this happen.”

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